About Ikea

Anything goes, but keep it seemly...

Postby MCC » Sun Jun 03, 2007 8:27 am

Harvard, Norway may be number one for fjords but fjords can be found:

wiki wrote:West coast of Europe
Faroe Islands
Norway
Iceland

West coast of New Zealand
Fiordland, in the southwest of the South Island

West coast of North America
British Columbia Coast, Canada down to Puget Sound
The south and west coasts of Alaska in the United States (Lynn Canal, Portland Canal, etc.)

West coast of South America
Southern Chile

Other glaciated regions
Other regions have fjords, but many of these are less pronounced due to more limited exposure to westerly
winds and less pronounced relief. Areas include:

Europe
Ireland (Ireland's only fjord is in Killary Harbour near Leenane, County Galway, on the west coast)
Scotland (where called firths, the Scots language cognate of fjord; lochs or sea lochs)
Sweden
Galicia in Spain
North America

Canada:
The south and west coasts of Newfoundland (Saglek Fjord, Nachvak Fjord, Hebron Bay, and Bonne Bay in
Gros Morne National Park)
The last 100 km of Quebec's Saguenay River
the Arctic Archipelago
United States
Somes Sound, Acadia National Park, Maine

Greenland
Arctic
Arctic islands
Antarctica
particularly the Antarctic Peninsula
Sub-antarctic islands



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Postby ikea-spokesperson » Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:22 am

So Havard and RV, what's it like to only have one day a year? (6 months night and 6 months day)
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Postby Havard » Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:32 am

ikea-spokesperson wrote:So Havard and RV, what's it like to only have one day a year? (6 months night and 6 months day)


To get the 6 month day and 6 month night you need to be living right on the North Pole. Tromsø (my home town) is at almost 70 degrees North, and we have a 2 month day in Summer, and a 2 month night in Winter. Both is fantastic! In winter you get fantastic Northern Lights playing in the skies, and even if the sun never comes up there is still this incredible light! And the midnight sun is quite possibly the most romantic thing on the planet!:D

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Postby tarek » Sun Jun 03, 2007 12:00 pm

Havard, you forgot "A-ha" as one of the famous Norwegian exports.........

I have seen the midnight sun in Finland.... was planning to go a bit north (Oulu & the city of the rock monsters:) ) but didn't have time.

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Postby Bigtone53 » Sun Jun 03, 2007 3:27 pm

Probably the best New Years Eve I have had was with my family on a frozen lake in Lapland, well within the Arctic Circle, with a large bonfire/barbecue on the ice (yes, you read that right) and the Northern Lights playing overhead. Magic

As Harvard says, just because the sun does not come up, there is still enough light to be getting on with and it is strangely beautiful.
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Postby RW » Sun Jun 03, 2007 4:47 pm

ikea-spokesperson wrote:So Havard and RV, what's it like to only have one day a year? (6 months night and 6 months day)

Well, I actually live further south in Finland where we have 365 days. Though some of the days are 22-23h long. The good thing with this is that we get to see the beautiful sunrises and sunsets. There's nothing better than sitting out on some cliffs by the sea, watching the sun set just before midnight and rise an hour or two later.

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Postby underquark » Sun Jun 03, 2007 10:09 pm

RW wrote:There's nothing better than sitting out on some cliffs by the sea, watching the sun set just before midnight and rise an hour or two later.
Unless you've got kids who won't go to sleep because "it's not dark yet"; (the converse is, of course, that in the winter they'll not go to bed just because it has got dark as "it's always dark early"). At this time of year, even in Scotland the light nights are a becoming a problem.
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Postby mikejapan » Sat Jun 09, 2007 1:13 pm

Spurred on by 999-springs, today for the first time in my life I went into IKEA (Funabashi, Tokyo) armed with a pencil and notebook. Here is a list I made;

1. It's massive - the size of a small African nation (probably the same GDP)
2. No graffiti
3. No litter
4. No holes
5. No funny smells
6. #2-5 are hardly surprising because that sort of thing doesn't happen in Japan
7. You get free pencils
8. You get free tape measures
9. You can leave your kids, free, with trained minders in a place called "Smaland" and wander round the store armed with a bleeper should anything happen
10. Smaland is fun for kids and includes a TV playing videos the size of a small cinema
11. There are 5 different types of herring in a jar; pickled, onion, dill, black current and snaps
12. It sells blue cheese which is difficult to get hold of in Japan
13. There is a crispbread called "Knackebrod"
14. Ice cream cones cost the equivalent of 22 pence (stirling)
15. You can drink as much soft drink/coffee as you like for 90 pence (I shared a cup with my wife so it only cost 45 pence each)
16. It sells Swedish beer called "Old Gold" which isn't particularly wonderful
17. I learnt the following animal names in Swedish; kanguru, elefant, krokodil, kamel, krabba, katt, ratta, lejon, and hund
18. There is a blue bucket seat in the kids' section that spins round and my daughter spent 20 minutes playing on (if I manage to work out how to upload a photo from my camera, I'll post it)
19. It's easy to get to and easy to park
20. My wife bought a fly swatter (plastic) for 18 pence which came in useful when we were unloading the car coz there was a massive spider which had probably come all the way from Sweden (I have never seen a spider that big or that looked like that before in Japan)
21. It was built on the site of an indoor snowboarding/skiing (with real snow) centre called SSAWS (Spring Summer Autumn Winter Snow). I used to go snowboarding there and was a bit upset when it closed down. The last time, I went with one of my students who crashed into the wall, broke her leg and spent 3 months in hospital.

All in all, a pleasent shopping experience. I spent a total of about 3 pounds, drank loads, my daughter had an ice cream, and I'm drinking the beer as I type this.

Not knowing much about furniture and fittings, I can't make any comments about quality/price, but I didn't see any microwaves on top of fridges.

Now if you want to have a go at a shop, have a go at "Gap" - I hate it.
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Postby 999_Springs » Fri Jun 15, 2007 7:22 pm

mikejapan wrote:1. It's massive - the size of a small African nation (probably the same GDP)

Hardly believable. What are its dimensions?
mikejapan wrote:10. Smaland is fun for kids and includes a TV playing videos the size of a small cinema

That is why it is called Smaland. But why not "Small land"?
mikejapan wrote:14. Ice cream cones cost the equivalent of 22 pence (stirling)

And the ice cream itself?
mikejapan wrote:19. It's easy to get to

The nearest Ikea from my house is a 45-minute bus journey away and longer if there is a traffic jam or the traffic lights decide to be evil.
mikejapan wrote:21. It was built on the site of an indoor snowboarding/skiing (with real snow) centre called SSAWS (Spring Summer Autumn Winter Snow).

Do you mean that it closed down just so that an Ikea store could be built?
mikejapan wrote:I spent a total of about 3 pounds

That's £2.05 more than what I would spend the next time I will go to Ikea Wembley (which will prbably be never). Their breakfasts are fine, despite their hard food, but it is still value for money.

Most of Ikea's stuff is cheap but circular beds and flat lightbulbs and mugs with holes in them do not interest me.
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Postby mikejapan » Thu Jun 21, 2007 2:55 pm

Here is some stuff about IKEA Funabashi. As you can see it's called smaland coz it's Swedish (I don't have a Swedish computer so I can't put the circle on the "a")

http://www.ikea.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/IkeaNearYouView?storeId=25&langId=-33&catalogId=10103&StoreName=funabashi

I think the indoor snowboard place closed down coz everyone kept breaking bones.

It's the size of Ghana.

The ice cream was OK but it melted quickly - God's fault coz it was a hot day (not IKEA's fault)
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Postby Havard » Thu Jun 21, 2007 3:02 pm

mikejapan wrote:(I don't have a Swedish computer so I can't put the circle on the "a")


I use that one in my name: Håvard. (now you have the "å" for future use!:) )

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Postby re'born » Thu Jun 21, 2007 4:04 pm

mikejapan wrote:Now if you want to have a go at a shop, have a go at "Gap" - I hate it.


Have you watched this yet?
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Postby mikejapan » Thu Jun 21, 2007 10:58 pm

Thånks Håvard.

å småll bånånå ånd ån åårdvårk ( I now feel positively Nordic!)

Cheers re'born

thåt wås å very funny site - I låughed out loud. I håve ådded it to my fåvourite wåtch list.
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Postby mikejapan » Fri Jun 22, 2007 2:07 pm

I've now watched all the videos on re'born's recommended site and they are brilliant. I love the mock political debating groups, especially the "Moat" video.
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Postby mizuki » Tue Dec 04, 2007 1:25 am

ikea roxx!:)
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