Riddle (sort of)

Anything goes, but keep it seemly...

Postby MCC » Tue May 30, 2006 3:32 pm

If we add all the double numbers in ruud's grid and transpose letters for numbers and sort throught the mess you'll find the words 'kick off', maybe your a footballer or other sportsman:?:

Or looking at clues:
RW wrote:...occupation.

...to rise, not fall...

...the answer is read left to right.

...row eight in the middle
equals the strings on a fiddle
and closer to the answer you'll get.

...hear the riddler's tune
sound in the night...

...how to read it? I told you how...

...will not bow...

Could you be something to do with music:?:

A musician:?: Part of a four string quartet:?:


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Postby udosuk » Tue May 30, 2006 4:59 pm

In case MCC hasn't guessed it right, I tried to create a grid with undertermined cells as "." and no grid lines & spaces:
Code: Select all
748..1653
639857..2
..14..987
4857....9
..3185764
167..4538
..6378..1
812649375
374512896

From RW's clues, we know we need to focus on the shape of the dots, work it left to right, from row 8 up towards the top (rise not fall), etc...

I thought there could be a picture from those dots, but couldn't see any... Perhaps Morse code or other concepts?:?:
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Postby coloin » Tue May 30, 2006 8:02 pm

As written
Code: Select all
   123 456 789
  *-----------*
A |7.8|..1|6..|
B |.3.|.5.|..2|
C |...|4..|9..|
  |---+---+---|
D |.8.|7..|..9|
E |..3|...|7..|
F |16.|##4|.3.|
  |---+---+---|
G |..6|..8|...|
H |.1.|...|.7.|
I |...|5..|8.6|
  *-----------*

Code: Select all
.---------.---------.---------.
| 7  4  8 | 29 29 1 | 6  5  3 |
| 6  3  9 | 8  5  7 | 14 14 2 |
| 25 25 1 | 4  36 36| 9  8  7 |
:---------+---------+---------:
| 4  8  5 | 7  36 36| 12 12 9 |
| 29 29 3 | 1  8  5 | 7  6  4 |
| 1  6  7 | 29 29 4 | 5  3  8 |
:---------+---------+---------:
| 59 59 6 | 3  7  8 | 24 24 1 |
| 8  1  2 | 6  4  9 | 3  7  5 |
| 3  7  4 | 5  1  2 | 8  9  6 |
'---------'---------'---------'

Code: Select all
748..1653
639857..2
..14..987
4857....9
..3185764
167..4538
..6378..1
812649375
374512896


Code: Select all
Still don't hear the riddler's tune
sound in the night, under a silver moon
just find the empty cells
and read what they tell's
and it'll crack before the end of June


## ? 2 sharps = f sharp and c
comprises the the d major key
"row 8 in the middle"
"4 strings in a fiddle"
which are - G,D,A and E
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Postby RW » Wed May 31, 2006 9:44 am

MCC wrote:A musician:?:


Yes, that is correct!!!!

coloin wrote:## ? 2 sharps = f sharp and c
comprises the the d major key


That was the closest anyone got to figure out the initial clue...

Code: Select all
   123 456 789

A  748|..1|653
B  639|857|..2
C  ..1|4..|987
   ---+---+---
D  485|7..|..9
E  ..3|185|764
F  167|##4|538
   ---+---+---
G  ..6|378|..1
H  812|649|375
I  374|512|896


Read left to right, one column of boxes at a time and you'll get:

Code: Select all
 C, E, G  - D,F#,A,C - G, B, D
(C major)     (D7)    (G major)


The basic building blocks of any horrible pop song you can hear on MTV (not the kind of music I do, though).

Seems the "rise, not fall" confused you all... (rhyme again:) ), but that wasn't meant as a clue, just a rhyme to complete the limerick. The 'fiddle' and 'tune' was meant to focus you at music, which seemed to work well.

The four strings on a fiddle was to help people advance the puzzle all the way to the deadly patterns without advanced technique (r8c5=4).

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Postby MCC » Wed May 31, 2006 3:10 pm

RW, hope this correct and that you can understand this:

Bb 2/4 C- | F- . F= F- A- | G- F= G- A- | F- . F= A- C- | B . F- | C- . A= A- F- |
G- . F= G- A- | F- . D= D . C= | F .

What am I:?:


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Postby RW » Thu Jun 01, 2006 9:18 am

MCC wrote:Bb 2/4 C- | F- . F= F- A- | G- F= G- A- | F- . F= A- C- | B . F- | C- . A= A- F- | G- . F= G- A- | F- . D= D . C= | F


The first Bb defines the key (F major) and 2/4 is of course the time signature. Looking at the letters, I hear "auld lang syne" and your rythm expressions seems to support it. But then it should probably be:

Bb 2/4 C- | F- . F= F- A- | G- .F= G- A- | F- . F= A- C- | D . D- | C- . A= A- F- | G- . F= G- A- | F- . D= D- C- | F


:D

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Postby MCC » Thu Jun 01, 2006 3:37 pm

RW wrote:
MCC wrote:Bb 2/4 C- | F- . F= F- A- | G- F= G- A- | F- . F= A- C- | B . F- | C- . A= A- F- | G- . F= G- A- | F- . D= D . C= | F


The first Bb defines the key (F major) and 2/4 is of course the time signature. Looking at the letters, I hear "auld lang syne" and your rythm expressions seems to support it. But then it should probably be:

Bb 2/4 C- | F- . F= F- A- | G- .F= G- A- | F- . F= A- C- | D . D- | C- . A= A- F- | G- . F= G- A- | F- . D= D- C- | F


:D

RW

Auld Lang Syne it is.

I took it from a 1877 book 'The Songs of Scotland' ed., by Brown and Pittman.

3rd bar - I miss out the dotted G-, as you stated.

5th bar - I made a mistake here it should have been | D. F- |

9th bar - Should have been a dotted F .

Other than that your 5th bar | D . D- | and 8th bar | F- . D= D- C- |are probably variations.


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Postby RW » Fri Jun 02, 2006 5:32 am

MCC wrote:Auld Lang Syne it is.

I took it from a 1877 book 'The Songs of Scotland' ed., by Brown and Pittman.


I must admit I just pulled it out of the back of my head, as I remember it sung by drunk Brittish people in partyhats in several movies...

RobertBurns.org wrote:On 17th December 1788, Burns said in a letter to Mrs Dunlop: 'Your meeting which you so well describe with your old schoolfellow and friend was truly interesting. Out upon the ways of the world! They spoil these 'social offsprings of the hear'. Two veterans of the 'men of the world' would have met with little more heart-workings than two old hacks worn out on the road. Apropos, is not the Scotch phrase Auld lang syne exceedingly expressive? There is an old song and tune which has often thrilled through my soul. You know I am an enthusiast in old Scotch songs. I shall give you the verses on the other sheet... Light be the turf on the breast of the heaven-inspired poet who composed this glorious fragment! There is more of the fire of native genius in it than in half a dozen of modern English Bacchanalians.' The song 'on the other sheet' was Burns's first version of 'Auld Lang Syne'.

You may listen to the tune he wrote 'on the other sheet' here. This is the first known written version of the song. The tune we know today was first published in Scottish Airs, 1799. Comparing the two, one can clearly hear the similarities, yet they are quite different. Very common for folktunes that have been passed on from mouth to mouth through generations. As there is no definite composer who has written a definite version of the tune, there is probably hundreds of small rythmic and melodic variations around today and your version of bars 5 and 8 is just as correct as mine.

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Postby MCC » Fri Jun 02, 2006 8:36 am

Thanks RW for drawing my attention to Burn's 1st version of Auld Lang Syne, like you say, it's similar but different.


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Riddle (Sort of)

Postby Cec » Sat Jun 03, 2006 6:29 am

While there's a bit of a lull I came across this following riddle today:

How quickly can you find out what is unusual about this paragraph? It looks so ordinary that you would think nothing was wrong with it at all - and in fact nothing is wrong, it's just distinctly odd . Why is it odd?

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Postby RW » Sat Jun 03, 2006 7:37 am

Your paragraph is just as odd and unusual as this paragraph! How confusing... I must think about it for an hour or two to find a satisfying solution.:)

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Re: Riddle (Sort of)

Postby lunababy_moonchild » Sat Jun 03, 2006 7:43 am

Cec wrote:How quickly can you find out what is unusual about this paragraph? It looks so ordinary that you would think nothing was wrong with it at all - and in fact nothing is wrong, it's just distinctly odd . Why is it odd?

The letter e does not appear.

Luna:D
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Re: Riddle (Sort of)

Postby Cec » Sat Jun 03, 2006 9:38 am

lunababy_moonchild wrote:"The letter e does not appear..".

That is correct.. well done Luna. According to my sources the letter "e" is the most common letter in the English language which is what makes the paragraph odd.

Whilst on the subject of the English language I'll throw in one more riddle - sorry RW to change your concentration so quickly:)

During conversation we often say "I am" or "you are" or "she/he/it is". Is it ever correct to say "I is.......

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Postby RW » Sat Jun 03, 2006 10:11 am

The word is after the word I is not usually correct, but maybe there is some exception...

Cec wrote:sorry RW to change your concentration so quickly


Don't worry, if you read my answer to the previous riddle you'll notice that I already had solved it and I should have got the "well done" instead of Luna:!:

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Riddle (sort of)

Postby Cec » Sat Jun 03, 2006 11:02 am

RW wrote:
Cec wrote:sorry RW to change your concentration so quickly

Don't worry, if you read my answer to the previous riddle you'll notice that I already had solved it and I should have got the "well done" instead of Luna:!:

Well.. actually, I didn't "notice" that you had solved the riddle which Luna correctly answered. My reference to "changing your concentration so quickly:) " included that Emoticon . My comment was intended in a light hearted manner to acknowledge my appreciation for your participitation. It now seems I should have simply said "Thank you RW for participating".

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