Off Topic

Anything goes, but keep it seemly...

Postby emm » Mon Feb 20, 2006 1:22 pm

MCC - I hope you're not implying that those terms apply to other people's contributions to this forum. Really! I think you're going a bit far - but I'll let you off because you are a lover of words. Me too. I've decided that I actually have too many words and what I need is not so much a Thesaurus, which might increase the outflow, as something to shut the sluice gates when enough is enough. An off switch.:D
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Postby MCC » Mon Feb 20, 2006 4:10 pm

Bate the mellifluous loquaciousness of an Em. Never:!:
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Postby emm » Sat Feb 25, 2006 11:48 pm

Loquaciousness is better than prolixity - right? Did you know there are 38 common misspellings of the word loquaciousness? Another problem word is dissappear. Also disscuss. Shall we?:D
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Postby MCC » Sun Feb 26, 2006 6:04 pm

em wrote:Loquaciousness is better than prolixity - right?

Definitely.
em wrote:Did you know there are 38 common misspellings of the word loquaciousness?

No, I didn't know there are 38 common misspellings of the word lockquayheusnest.
em wrote:Another problem word is dissappear.

A short while ago, on this site, was the word 'disappear', I managed to hold back about inquiring why they were dissing the pear and for them to stop the harassment.
em wrote:Also disscuss. Shall we?:D

Are we talking about 'Freedom of Speech' and 'Censorship':?:

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Postby emm » Mon Feb 27, 2006 3:54 am

MCC wrote:lockquayheusnest.

This one's not very common! OK - 39.

MCC wrote:Are we talking about 'Freedom of Speech' and 'Censorship'

I don't want to harp on but actually I was talking about the incorrect use of the double ss. I'm OK if you want to change the subject though. I'm happy to discuss any subject you pick and I'll give it my best shot whether I know anything about it or not. We could move on to the apostrophe theory. Too boring? How about seaweed wraps. Know anything about them?

PS : You know you shouldn't encourage me.:D
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Postby MCC » Mon Feb 27, 2006 6:37 pm

Re the double 's':

1-Senior moment.
2-Junior moment.
3-Second 's' is silent.
4-My dictionary has a double 's'.
5-My spelling is atrocious.
6-I didn't write this.
7-There's a snake in my computer.
8-My prestidigitatory skills need practice.
9-My spellchecker finally agreed with me, reluctantly.
10-There is no 10.
10-Memory lapse.

Any or all the above, take your pick.



About seaweed wraps, nothing, but I did try some seaweed once, tasted just like oily fish.
The Welsh have a dish composing laver, an edible seaweed, boiled, dipped in oatmeal, and fried.

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Postby emm » Tue Feb 28, 2006 10:10 pm

There's a subject I know nothing about - Welsh cuisine - except for leeks. It made me think of Welsh Rarebit and I realised I had no idea what that was, so I looked it up - butter, cream, beer & cheese. Mmmm - that'd go nicely with oily deep fried crumbed seaweed. Is obesity a problem over there?
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Postby MCC » Wed Mar 01, 2006 12:18 pm

I always thought that Welsh Rarebit was melted cheese on toast, don't know about the beer though unless it comes in pint glasses.

I don't know if the Welsh are any different to the rest of the UK when it comes to obesity.
A trend that I believe started in Scotland is the deep-fried Mars bar, nowadays deep-frying anything you can think of.

Over the years competitiveness has been abolished in schools, everyone must be a winner there must be no losers. So no games, no running around, no playing tag, no skipping, nothing energetic; making daisy chains, definitely not, the children could be maimed or killed doing that.
The Government sold off school sports fields, now children are getting obese and everyone is wondering why.

What about Australia? Em. Is obesity a problem there?

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Postby emm » Thu Mar 02, 2006 3:54 am

Oh yes, it’s huge. They love pies and beer.:D I read an article recently that said that over half of all Australians are overweight or obese, which is pretty staggering, but worse, only a third actually think they are - they have a big appetite for self denial. (Don’t we all!)

I didn’t make up that recipe for Welsh Rarebit you know – I looked up a few and they all had beer in them. Did you know it was originally called Welsh Rabbit, as an insult to the Welsh who couldn’t afford rabbits? I’m not sure how they could afford beer and cheese and cream, but anyway it’s no longer PC to accuse the Welsh of being poor and so the name has been changed - but just a little, so they’ll remember their sorry past and don’t forget who’s boss. (I made that last bit up - but it could be true.):D

Selling off school sport’s fields is the saddest thing I’ve heard in ages – I suppose that’s one effect of population density. Our kids are more sedentary too, but we do still let them break their arms and legs climbing trees and actually encourage them to smash themselves up on the rugby field since it’s in the national interest! Talking of being sedentary - it’s time I took the beseeching dog for a walk.
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re: seaweed

Postby Pat » Thu Mar 02, 2006 10:58 am

MCC wrote:The Welsh have a dish composing laver, an edible seaweed, boiled, dipped in oatmeal, and fried.

it's good food - why would it be called seaweed?
just because it grows wild??



Excusify me, but is 'refugeed' a verb?

(The Christian Science Monitor 2005.Sep.23)

- more words to (dis)cuss


~ Pat
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Postby emm » Fri Mar 03, 2006 12:04 am

Are weeds always wild? I have quite a few growing very happily domestically.

Good article on whateverspeak. I empathise with the vocabulationist at the gloominous prospect of mass ignorism! Just the terminology - not the idea. It's funny how one thing leads to another - especially when you Google - somehow this led me to a word I'd never heard before - noesis - and noetics "the laws of logic" - we should know these words, yes?
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Re: re: seaweed

Postby MCC » Sat Mar 04, 2006 2:51 pm

Pat wrote:...why would it be called seaweed?
just because it grows wild??


I've been unable to find an origin for the word SEAWEED, it seems to have originated in the mists of time.

THOUGHT
Seweed is probably the combination of two words: SEA and WEED.

'WEED' is probably not the garden variety that grows wild but has another meaning; that of clothing.

Widow's Weeds is the term for a mourning outfit; checkout this link.

It could be that the word 'WEED' in seaweed derives from this meaning of clothing; That which wraps the bodies of drowned sailors.

Any comments?
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Postby emm » Sun Mar 05, 2006 12:03 pm

I hadn’t thought of seaweed like that – but sailors’ shrouds is good imagery. I prefer that to overgrown, smothering plants (which it probably is!) I also really like the term widow’s weeds - it’s a bit bizarre but it appeals, because it's so descriptive. Even though its origin is different from the other weeds, it still suggests destitution and abandonment and unwantedness - and all those w’s!- like weep and wail and woe. It drips with sadness. That’s a bit OTT, but you know what I mean.

Talking of words with two meanings - why does ‘welsh’ mean to cheat? I imagine the Welsh could be feeling a little hard done by. The dictionary says ‘origin unknown’ – but I’m wondering if it had something to do with the rabbits.

And talking of meanings – here’s another meaning for noetics. ‘A kind of intuitive consciousness—direct and immediate access to knowledge beyond what is available to our normal senses and the power of reason.’ That doesn’t sound like ‘the laws of logic’ at all.
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Postby MCC » Sun Mar 05, 2006 1:27 pm

In my O.E.Ref.Dictionary, Noetic is:

adj.
1-of the intellect
2-purely intellectual or abstract
3-given to intellectual speculation

n.
the science of the intellect

I believe that 'noetic' has been usurped by the New-Age movement.



In Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Welsh,To. To decamp from a racecourse without settling one's debts; to avoid settling a debt. Hence a 'welsher' is one who does this. The origin of the term is uncertain.

How's about this for a possible explanation:
A 'welsher' is someone you would rather not be in company with, someone you would rather be 'Well shod of'.
So by contraction over time 'Well shod' could become 'Wellsh'd', then 'Wellshed', finally 'Welshed'.

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Postby emm » Thu Mar 09, 2006 9:23 am

When I think about it, MCC, I’ve always assumed it was ‘well shot’ not ‘well shod’. As in shoot, fire, catapult, eject, propel, blast etc some undesirable object out of your life. As in ‘You dirty, low-down, lyin’, cheatin’ scoundrel.’ BANG! There! She's 'well shot' of him - that makes sense.

'Well shod' could be the same sort of thing by means of a horse I s'pose - but are you're getting mixed up between ‘well shed’ and ‘shod off’?
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