Magic Sudoku

Everything about Sudoku that doesn't fit in one of the other sections

Postby Red Ed » Sun Jul 17, 2005 6:17 pm

udosuk wrote:I just want to praise Red Ed for showing all the elegant grids ...
Why, thank you.:)
... like the one with magic squares in 3 boxes and 6 almost magic ones in the remaining boxes with 2 perfect long diagonals. Just wonder is it the unique one with all these features (barring those which are essentially the same)?
It's essentially the only one in which all three magic 3x3s are the same; I've not tried allowing them to be different.

Also, I think the 64 5-magic-square grids you shown could be essentially grouped into 3 ... All of the remaining 61 can be transformed into one of these 3 by repeatedly applying rotation, reflection and substitution.
Yes, I think that's right. Your pictures are a lot clearer than my somewhat abstract algorithmic description!
Red Ed
 
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Postby dukuso » Sun Jul 17, 2005 9:41 pm

why the condition with the diagonals ?
A 3*3 has 2 diagonals, but 3 rows and 3 columns.
And there is no diagonal condition in the original sudoku.

So, how many d-dimensional n^2*n^2-sudokus are there where each
minirow and each minicolumn sums to (n*n+1)*n/2 ?
What, if sums are taken modulo n ?
What, if sums are taken modulo n^2 ?
dukuso
 
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Postby dukuso » Sun Jul 17, 2005 9:41 pm

double posting edited (apparantly deleting is no longer possible ?)

double posts happen when I hit "page back" after posting
Last edited by dukuso on Mon Jul 18, 2005 12:01 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Postby TN_Mike » Mon Jul 18, 2005 1:01 pm

tso wrote:Especially interesting would be a puzzle with letters rather than numbers that could NOT be solved with out using the additional information that a 9 letter word -- that is NOT given -- will be spelled out -- either in a specified row or anywhere in the grid.
...
A real genius might create a Word Sudoku with DUAL solutions -- the word that is spelled out in one solution being an anagram of the one spelled in the other!


Hello all. Here's a stab at something along those lines. The puzzle has multiple solutions (I haven't yet checked how many!), but there are two solutions that form 9-letter words, top-left to bottom-right. The words revealed by these two solutions are anagrammatic. The puzzle is not (AFAIK) solveable by purely sudoku methods - you'll need to figure the word out to get sufficient cells to proceed.

Letters to use: A C E G L N O T U (one of these is a "spare" just to make things harder!)

Code: Select all
....NU.A.
......U..
N......E.
..N......
E.O...T.A
......N..
.N......O
..C......
.G.NO....


I don't think this is a very well put-together puzzle - there's no obvious starting point where one might apply normal sudoku rules. I'll spend some more time on this and try to come up with a more interesting grid.

An anagram-finder program would probably get you the answers in no time at all:(

Extra clue if required: first and last letters of both words are c and e respectively

-----------------------------------------------------------------
http://sudoku.top-notch.co.uk
TN_Mike
 
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Postby tso » Wed Jul 20, 2005 3:42 am

First, I've started a new thread for Word Sudoku. since it's a separate conversation.


TN_Mike wrote:Hello all. Here's a stab at something along those lines. The puzzle has multiple solutions (I haven't yet checked how many!), but there are two solutions that form 9-letter words, top-left to bottom-right. ...


*Possible* spoiler below...















The best I can do is CATALOGUE and COAGULATE -- but even with these inserted into the puzzle, the puzzles still have multiple solutions. Do I have the wrong words, or did you not put in enough clues?
tso
 
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