callput

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callput

Postby callput » Fri May 31, 2013 5:37 am

2 8 56 4 359 7 359 159 16 35 7 4 69 359 1 8 59 2 135 16 9 2 358 68 35 4 7 15 9 15 8 2 3 7 6 4 6 2 3 5 7 4 19 189 18 7 4 8 1 6 9 2 3 5 4 3 16 79 189 2 15 1578 168 8 16 7 3 4 5 16 2 9 9 5 2 67 18 68 4 178 3

The above string, when pasted into SudoCue generates a pop-up message saying that the puzzle cannot be solved with a unique solution, that it may have come from a Samurai puzzle (which in fact it did).

However, the SudoCue solver log shows all but the last step..

Interestingly, though, the puzzle is solvable.

So my questions are:

1. Is there any special reason that this puzzle, according to SudoCue, cannot be solved?
2. Why doesn't the solver log have the last step (the placing of a 6 in r8c7?

I have never seen SudoCue mess up like this, so it must be me. Any comments are most welcome.
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Re: callput

Postby enxio27 » Fri May 31, 2013 7:09 pm

callput wrote:The above string, when pasted into SudoCue generates a pop-up message saying that the puzzle cannot be solved with a unique solution, that it may have come from a Samurai puzzle (which in fact it did).

A multi-grid puzzle cannot be solved with just one grid. SudoCue isn't capable of handling Samurai puzzles, and it can't solve a single grid from a multi-grid puzzle. Try SudokuSolver instead (you will need to import the entire puzzle, not just one grid): http://www.rcbroughton.co.uk/sudoku/ss_index.htm
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Postby Pat » Sun Jun 02, 2013 12:51 pm

callput wrote:
2 8 56 4 359 7 359 159 16 35 7 4 69 359 1 8 59 2 135 16 9 2 358 68 35 4 7 15 9 15 8 2 3 7 6 4 6 2 3 5 7 4 19 189 18 7 4 8 1 6 9 2 3 5 4 3 16 79 189 2 15 1578 168 8 16 7 3 4 5 16 2 9 9 5 2 67 18 68 4 178 3

---Interestingly, though, the puzzle is solvable.

    2. Why doesn't the solver log have the last step (the placing of a 6 in r8c7)?


"is solvable"??
it has 12 answers.

"placing 6 in r8c7":
cannot be proven.
(r8c7=1 is possible.)


        pedantic, perhaps even petty

        but: explicit, hoping to prevent any ambiguity
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